YOUR EXPERT COVID-19 TEAM

An expert team to help you and your employees return to work safely during the COVID-19 global pandemic. 

Workplace Readiness

Today workplace safety requires multiple layers of protection. 

Personal Protective Equipment

Fulfilling your organization’s medial supply needs. 

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What you need to know

Businesses and employers all play a role if we are to stop the spread of this disease

what all employers should know

What should I do if an employee comes to work with COVID-19 symptoms?

Employees who have symptoms when they arrive at work or become sick during the day should immediately be separated from other employees, customers, and visitors and sent home. Employees who develop symptoms outside of work should notify their supervisor and stay home.

Sick employees should follow CDC-recommended steps. Employees should not return to work until they have met the criteria to discontinue home isolation and have consulted with a healthcare provider and state or local health department.

Employers should not require sick employees to provide a COVID-19 test result or healthcare provider’s note to validate their illness, qualify for sick leave, or return to work. Healthcare provider offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and not able to provide such documentation in a timely manner.

Source: CDC.gov

If employees have been exposed but are not showing symptons, should I allow them to work?

Employees may have been exposed if they are a “close contact” of someone who infected, which is defined as being within approximately 6 feet (2 meters) of a person with COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time:

  • Potentially exposed employees who have symptoms of COVID-19 should self-isolate and follow CDC recommended steps.
  • Potentially exposed employees who do not have symptoms should remain at home or in a comparable setting and practice social distancing for 14 days.

All other employees should self-monitor for symptoms such as fever, cough, or shortness of breath. If they develop symptoms, they should notify their supervisor and stay home.

Source: cdc.gov

How do I keep employees who interact with customers safe?

To keep your employees safe, you should:

  • Consider options to increase physical space between employees and customers such as opening a drive- through, erecting partitions, and marking floors to guide spacing at least six feet apart.
  • At least once a day clean and disinfect surfaces frequently touched by multiple people. This includes door handles, desks, phones, light switches, and faucets,
  • Consider assigning a person to rotate throughout the workplace to clean and disinfect surfaces.
  • Consider scheduling handwashing breaks so employees can wash their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Consider scheduling a relief person to give cashiers and service desk workers an opportunity to wash their hands.

Source: cdc/gov

Do my employees need to wear cloth face coverings or personal protective equipment?

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, especially in areas of significant community transmission. Cloth face coverings may prevent people who don’t know they have the virus from transmitting it to others. These face coverings are not surgical masks or respirators and are not appropriate substitutes for them in workplaces where masks or respirators are recommended or required.

How often should employees wash their hands while at work?

CDC recommends employees protect themselves from respiratory illness with everyday preventive actions, including good hand hygiene. Employees should wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not readily available, especially during key times when persons are likely to be infected by or spread germs:

  • After blowing one’s nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • After using the toilet
  • After touching garbage
  • Before and after the work shift
  • Before and after work breaks
  • After touching objects that have been handled by customers

Source: cdc/gov

the plan

Your ability to respond to the post COVID-19 workplace environment is linked to good planning.

We offer three key solutions for reopening your business. 

Step 01. Disinfected Conditions

Making sure your facility is fully clean, disinfected and equipped with a blueprint for maintaining safe conditions.

 

Step 02. Employee Support System

Setting up a support system in place for employees as they return to work and adjust to new realities and emotional challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Step 03. Risk Protection Plan

Creating a plan for a safe work environment that protects employees and customers alike from risks connected to COVID-19, including exposure and transmission.

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